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Sculpting a Good Idea into a Great Book - with Gail Anderson-Dargatz

 

When: Tuesday, June 26, 2018 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.
Where: SWG Office (100 – 1150 8th Avenue), Regina
Cost: $25 SWG members or $50 non-members

Many book manuscripts suffer from a lack of thorough development. This can stand in the way of their potential for success, or even prevent them from being published. In this interactive session, award-winning novelist (The Cure for Death by Lightning) and writing coach Gail explores the steps and strategies of development editing that help turn a good book idea into a great book. 

Participation will be limited to 15 participants, so please register in advance here. Deadline for registration is Friday, June 22, 2018. 

* Payments must be made prior to the workshop. You will not be able to pay at the event.

For more information contact Oin Nicholson, SWG Program Coordinator, at 306-791-7746 or swgevents@skwriter.com.

Gail Anderson-Dargatz has been published worldwide in English and in many other languages. A Recipe for Bees and The Cure for Death by Lighting were international bestsellers, and were both finalists for the prestigious Giller Prize in Canada. The Cure for Death by Lightning won the UK’s Betty Trask Prize among other awards. Both Turtle Valley and A Rhinestone Button were national bestsellers in Canada and her first book, The Miss Hereford Stories, was short-listed for the Leacock Award for humour. Her most recent novel, The Spawning Grounds, released in fall 2016, was again a national bestseller.

Gail offers developmental edits and works with writers from around the world through her on-line teaching forums. She also hosts The Spawning Grounds Writers’ Retreat in October at the Sorrento Centre, BC, and the Providence Bay Writer’s Camp on Manitoulin Island, ON, in July. For more, please visit her website at www.gailanderson-dargatz.ca or follow her @AndersonDargatz.

 

 

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